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ARCHIFYNOW > TIPS & IDEAS > Peddlethorp and Crosson Architects design models with recycled Countdown collectables

Peddlethorp and Crosson Architects design models with recycled Countdown collectables

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If you were a fan of our Model Citizens @ home competition, the newest collectable from Countdown might be right up your alley. The supermarket chain’s collectable reward for this season will be sets of eco-friendly, interlocking bricks, made from minimum 80 per cent recycled plastic (and recyclable themselves). Crosson Architects and Peddlethorp have kicked things off by creating models for two futuristic supermarkets.

Ken Crosson says that his team’s design is “Jetson’s inspired”. He says, “We wanted to really push the boundaries on a futuristic model so decided to build up instead of out to reduce the supermarket’s footprint.” The concept is complete with solar panels and a light rail for transport to and from the store.

Peddlethorp and Crosson Architects design models with recycled Countdown collectables

Sam Carradus, of Crosson Architects, explains that their design reflects the firm’s core values of giving back to the community and take up a smaller footprint. “In effect, the tower acts as a distribution hub,” he says. “Everything is activated by wind turbines and solar power including the light rail for incoming deliveries and the tectonic elements to allow drones to fly in and out.

“Beyond that there’s an undulating green landscape with a lively community garden instead of a carpark where people can grow fruit and veggies, have a picnic, ride their BMX and walk their dogs while their order is delivered via drones.

“It’s a nucleus for communities much like the supermarkets of today.”

On the other side, Peddlethorp co-director Richard Goldie says that their design aimed to be “the Apple store of supermarkets”. He says that the minimalist design is “inviting, welcoming and even though there’s not too much in it, it draws you in”.

Jonathan Jordan and Cameron Pattullo of Peddlethorp created the final model for the firm. “Our design challenges what we know of the supermarket – what it is and what it gives,” they note.

Peddlethorp and Crosson Architects design models with recycled Countdown collectables

“It’s the modern version of a market experience, with a variety of pop-up booths to accommodate cooking classes, lessons on sustainable eating and tastings to encourage healthy and authentic interaction with food. The tree running through its middle is a native of course.

“For us, the best thing about the bricks is that they are simple. Just a brick and modules and then simply your mind left to do something creative and simple via repetition and design. We challenged their simple form by using them upside down and building vertically.”

Both firms hoped to spur creativity and show what can be made with a humble building brick.

The supermarket reports that Countdown Bricks are certified by Environmental Choice New Zealand (ECNZ) and are recycled from items that would have otherwise ended up in landfill like swimming goggles and even old fridges.

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